24 Invaluable Skills to Learn For Free Online in 2014

heytherewolfgirl:

1. Become awesome at Excel. (x)

2. Learn how to code. (x) (x)

3. Make a dynamic website. (x) (x) (x)

4. Learn to make a mobile game. (x) (x)

5. Start reading faster. (x)

6. Learn a language! (x)

7. Pickle your own vegetables. (x)

8. Improve your public speaking skills. (x)

9. Get a basic handle of statistics. (x)

10. Understand basic psychology. (x)

11. Make your own music. Guitar (x) Voice (x) Songwriting (x) Music Production (x)

12. Learn to negotiate. (x)

13. Stop hating math. (x)

14. Start drawing! (x)

15. Make your own animated GIF. (x)

16. Appreciate jazz. (x)

17. Write better. (x) (x)

18. Get better at using photoshop. (x)

19. Take decent pictures. (x) (x)

20. Learn to knit. (x)

21. Get started with investing in stocks. (x) (x)

22. Clean your house in a short amount of time. (x) (x)

23. Start practicing yoga. (x) (x)

24. Tie your shoelaces more efficiently. (x)

Original post by Buzzfeed.

thisartadventure:

In the last four years I have taught perspective a billion different ways. I always revamp perspective lessons on a never ending quest to make them as effective as possible. I’ve found that students really like learning about perspective because it explains a lot of mysteries of drawing. However, I always have a hard time translating drawing an imagined space in perspective to drawing from observation. So that’s what I’ve been focusing on this semester and I’ve figured out somethings that are working! 

These are some pictures from my 2-Point unit. We started off with a really simple intro to 2-point (boxes floating in the air-style). Then I wanted the kids to get a real experience drawing an interior in 2-point but I haven’t had great success with that before. To simplify, I took a picture of the area of the school we would be drawing, projected it and drew on top of it to demonstrate how they could find their vanishing points. They had some time to think about the space before we went out to draw. You guys, it’s really hard to draw in perspective from observation and 85% of the kids did an awesome job! They had two class periods to work and then they were able to add detail and color in the classroom for a day. I’m so proud of the way these turned out, a few of the kids really went beyond my expectations. 

The other thing we are doing is drawing a crazy still life of boxes. This is also the culmination of our charcoal unit so the kids are using either an additive or subtractive charcoal method to draw the box still life in 2-point with detailed value. To avoid trying to keep the still life untouched I hot glued all of the boxes together. (How have I never thought of that before?!)

One little prep exercise we did- I clustered the boxes in groups of three (before they were glued) and the kids had to do quick gesture drawings of each set to get a feel for the proportions and the way the boxes sit in space. 

So far the still lifes are turning out pretty well! I’ll post pics of the finished drawings soon!

Reblogged from This Art Adventure
dwsteven:

Sometimes teachers have just had enough…

dwsteven:

Sometimes teachers have just had enough…

Tags: teaching

nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh

Reblogged from ART AND OTHER STUFF
markovnikoving:

please read this excerpt from a linguistics textbook about a rich guy that decided to change the way english was spoken just because he liked it better, then continue to belligerently argue that it is “objectively incorrect” to refer to someone with singular they pronouns
"they isnt singular for a reason" no actually, nothing in language is ever for a reason ever, stop pretending this is in any way a valid or acceptable justification for enforcing gender binary language
also, aave. those excerpts of what english was like before lowth decided he was important enough to govern how a language “should” be spoken are very similar to aave today. those of us that dont speak aave are the ones that changed!
(fromkin and rodman, an introduction to language)

markovnikoving:

please read this excerpt from a linguistics textbook about a rich guy that decided to change the way english was spoken just because he liked it better, then continue to belligerently argue that it is “objectively incorrect” to refer to someone with singular they pronouns

"they isnt singular for a reason" no actually, nothing in language is ever for a reason ever, stop pretending this is in any way a valid or acceptable justification for enforcing gender binary language

also, aave. those excerpts of what english was like before lowth decided he was important enough to govern how a language “should” be spoken are very similar to aave today. those of us that dont speak aave are the ones that changed!

(fromkin and rodman, an introduction to language)

madamelaluna:

lumpy-pizza-princess:

flowersnail:

Breathe: I found this app yesterday and it’s really great! It has a lot of meditation tips and it teaches you meditation skills. You put in how you are feeling, and it will give you a choice between three tapes to listen to. I find this to be a really great
self care app and it makes me feel good when I’m stressed out. I think that this is a really good tool to use if you’re working on self care and self love. Let me know if you guys like it!

Just downloaded this and it seems great!

Currently downloading

rifflebooks:

A French mathematics teacher is said to have devised a powerful technique for keeping classroom chatter to a minimum: Whenever his class gets too noisy, he simply writes a spoiler from Game of Thrones on the board. As in: “Oh, you haven’t finished reading A Storm of Swords? LET ME TELL YOU EVERYONE WHO DIES.”
According to Belgium’s Nieuwsblad, the teacher, at wits end with his noisy class, asked which of his students watched Game of Thrones. Around three quarters of the students raised their hands. “Well, I’ve read all the books,” the teacher replied. “If there’s too much noise, I will write the names of the dead on the board. They are enough to fill the whole year and I can even describe how they die.”
When students in the class decided to test him, he delivered on his word, writing the names of everyone killed through the end of the series’ third season, “for those who [had] not seen it.” This resulted in what one student described as “a religious silence” for the rest of the lesson.
[Via io9.com]

sweet mother of holy that is the best teaching advice i will ever read

rifflebooks:

A French mathematics teacher is said to have devised a powerful technique for keeping classroom chatter to a minimum: Whenever his class gets too noisy, he simply writes a spoiler from Game of Thrones on the board. As in: “Oh, you haven’t finished reading A Storm of Swords? LET ME TELL YOU EVERYONE WHO DIES.”

According to Belgium’s Nieuwsblad, the teacher, at wits end with his noisy class, asked which of his students watched Game of Thrones. Around three quarters of the students raised their hands. “Well, I’ve read all the books,” the teacher replied. “If there’s too much noise, I will write the names of the dead on the board. They are enough to fill the whole year and I can even describe how they die.”

When students in the class decided to test him, he delivered on his word, writing the names of everyone killed through the end of the series’ third season, “for those who [had] not seen it.” This resulted in what one student described as “a religious silence” for the rest of the lesson.

[Via io9.com]

sweet mother of holy that is the best teaching advice i will ever read

Reblogged from Title (optional)

rose-doctor-tardis:

transdimensionalbeing:

thecreationmonster:

trilluminat1:

meenahtho:

until this year of high school i always laughed at these because i thought they were inaccurate, they are not. they are not at all inaccurate.

THE MIDDLE ONE. Omg.

American public school in one post

Why do they always want to go outside?!

Freedom

*internal wailing*

Reblogged from Sweet Bambi Anarchy
millionsmillions:

Why do we reread novels obsessively as children but hardly ever as adults? At The Morning News, Clay Risen discusses why rereading appeals to children so much. “It was a residual sense of wonder, left over long after I had accepted that the reality on the page and the reality beyond it are distinct.” Pair with: Our essay on the pleasures and perils of rereading.

millionsmillions:

Why do we reread novels obsessively as children but hardly ever as adults? At The Morning News, Clay Risen discusses why rereading appeals to children so much. “It was a residual sense of wonder, left over long after I had accepted that the reality on the page and the reality beyond it are distinct.” Pair with: Our essay on the pleasures and perils of rereading.

Reblogged from teaching literacy.

A question and a warning.

feeble-mindedfey:

alisonteaches:

feeble-mindedfey:

Calling all Secondary teachers in the UK or International Schools in Europe: are there Humanities, History, English and English Language positions out there? 

Warning: If you’re thinking about moving to Australia to teach OR considering taking an Education course in Australia - it’s going to be a struggle to find a job unless your methods include Science, Maths, or Languages. There is a nationwide job shortage in both the primary and secondary sector and yet the universities are offering more and more Education places each year. I would go as far as to say the situation is dire.

seconded. especially in any metropolitan area, some country areas are ok though.

It’s really worrying (and infuriating) how many people have said to me ’ but I heard there is a shortage of teachers’ or ’ oh, come on, there are always jobs for teachers’. No and no. 

Uhg, they always say there is a shortage of teachers, or that there’s going to be a big turn over because all the older teachers are about to retire. They’ve been saying that for the past ten years at the uni I went to apparently.

The truth is, teachers are working longer, and overworking. Class sizes are huge, and expectations of class loads are also bigger than the should be. I think a 0.8 teaching position should be considered ‘full time’ due to the sheer amount of out-of-hours work that’s actually involved.

If all full time teachers had a teaching load of 0.8, and they reduced class sizes, then I think there would not only be enough work for more teachers, but students would have better learning environments and better teachers.

Reblogged from feeble-minded fey.

A question and a warning.

feeble-mindedfey:

Calling all Secondary teachers in the UK or International Schools in Europe: are there Humanities, History, English and English Language positions out there? 

Warning: If you’re thinking about moving to Australia to teach OR considering taking an Education course in Australia - it’s going to be a struggle to find a job unless your methods include Science, Maths, or Languages. There is a nationwide job shortage in both the primary and secondary sector and yet the universities are offering more and more Education places each year. I would go as far as to say the situation is dire.

seconded. especially in any metropolitan area, some country areas are ok though.

Reblogged from feeble-minded fey.
hipsterenglishteacher:

From our friends at WeAreTeachers.

hipsterenglishteacher:

From our friends at WeAreTeachers.

fivebyfreakingfive:

doc—rokstar:

avatartagg:

gallifrey-feels:

ibelieveitsanime:

songofspoilers:

gildatheplant:

I feel that anyone who believes Romeo & Juliet is about some kind of Great and Timeless Love TM* needs to see this.

WE WERE JUST TALKING ABOUT THIS TODAY IN MY SHAKESPEARE CLASS. 

If you go and actually read what Romeo says to Benvolio in the first scene, you will realize that he is only upset because HE WANTED ROSALINE’S BODY AND SHE SAID NO AND SO ROMEO WAS MOPING AND PITCHING A FIT ABOUT IT. Then, the second he lays eyes on Juliet, he’s basically saying

During the balcony scene, Romeo talks about how he scaled the wall of the garden to see Juliet. That is not romantic. That is disrespectful to her. This is a private area of the Capulet home, and Capulet built the wall around it to protect his daughter. This was a time when a woman’s virtue was the most important thing she owned. If Juliet was found with a man in this very private part of her home, everyone would think she was no longer a virgin, her reputation would be ruined, and it would be much harder, if not impossible, for her father to make a good marriage.

Speaking of good marriages, Count Paris is seen as the bad guy because he “comes between” Romeo and Juliet. Capulet had arranged for Paris to marry Juliet in 2 years time, when she would be 16, in a time when most women were already married and mothers by the time they were Juliet’s age at (almost but not quite) 14. Most fathers would have already had their daughters married by now, but he wants to wait two more years AND PARIS IS OKAY WITH THAT. Not only that, but Paris is young (her father could have had her married to a 60 year old man), titled (he’s a fucking Count), wealthy (again, he’s a count, which means Juliet will have financial stability), and, from what we see of him, he is a very good guy. Capulet could have done a LOT worse in choosing his son-in-law.

Finally, here’s something to consider: Juliet was 13, Romeo was 17. Their relationship lasted 3 days, defied their parents, and ended in the deaths of 6 people.

If I ever hear you say that Romeo and Juliet is the greatest love story ever told, I will bitch slap you.

That is all.

THANK YOU! SOMEBODY FINALLY PUT IT IN WORDS FOR ME

It wasn’t a romance. Shakespeare never wrote romances. It was a fucking tragedy you dumb cunts.

Here’s the full video: x

Reblogging for: It wasn’t a romance. Shakespeare never wrote romances. It was a fucking tragedy you dumb cunts.